The issue of whistle blowing in the case of ms watkins a vice president of enron

sherron watkins enron letter

Others claim that what she did doesn't even qualify as true whistleblowing, because she never took her concerns outside the company, to the financial regulator or a third party. I think it is likely they will indict Jeffrey Skilling.

However, she did something no one else at Enron was willing to do. In essence, her expertise and knowledge of accounting, the core of her professionalism, tells her that something is wrong.

Both displayed personal motivations for not taking further action.

What happened to enron

He knew the future for Enron was looking bleak. Her lawyer says there were no retaliations by those colleagues still around these days; a source close to her, though, told the LA Times that Watkins was made to feel "an outcast. Was he telling the truth about how little he knew? A whistle-blower would have written that letter to the Houston Chronicle, and long before August; Watkins wrote it to Ken Lay, and warned him of potential whistle-blowers lurking among them. In its prime, Fortune named Enron the most innovative company for 6 consecutive years [2]. Back in , Watkins was working with Andrew Fastow, the chief financial officer now charged with fraud, when she began to witness aggressive accounting. Watkins had prepared five memos totaling seven pages in length that outlined the problems facing the company. They changed her own life, forever. We haven't met her in our living rooms, on TV in front of a bank of microphones, not yet. In addition to her job, Watkins kept her silence, at least publicly. She could have gone public with her memo and likely prompted a detailed investigation, but decided to keep her actions within the company. She never did. That's minimal, compared to sell-offs by other executives. And so we know that they all knew too.

She clears her throat at what's obviously a recurring question. She was circumspect enough to do some networking across the fence at Arthur Andersen and put the same concerns to Andersen's Enron man, David Duncan, and two other partners.

Back inWatkins was working with Andrew Fastow, the chief financial officer now charged with fraud, when she began to witness aggressive accounting. While working for Fastow, Watkins reviewed the assets Enron considered selling. In her memo, Watkins wondered, "Has Enron become a risky place to work?

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Person of the Week: 'Enron Whistleblower' Sherron Watkins